Ways to create a file with the echo command:

echo. > example.bat (creates an empty file called "example.bat")

echo message > example.bat (creates example.bat containing "message")
echo message >> example.bat (adds "message" to a new line in example.bat)
(echo message) >> example.bat (same as above, just another way to write it)

Output to path

A little problem you might run into when doing this:

echo Hello how are you? > C:\Users\Ben Tearzz\Desktop\example.bat

(This will NOT make a file on the Desktop, and might show an error message)

But then how do we do it? Well it's actually extremely simple... When typing a path or file name that has a space included in it's name, then remember to use "quotes"

echo Hello how are you? > "C:\Users\Ben Tearzz\Desktop\example.bat"
(This will make a file on MY Desktop)

But what if you want to make a file that outputs a new file?

echo message > file1.bat > example.bat

(This is NOT going to output:
"message > file1.bat" to example.bat

Then how do we do this?

echo message ^> file1.bat > example.bat

(This will output: 
"message > file1.bat" to example.bat

Same goes for other stuff in batch

If you haven't learned what variables and statements are, then you most likely won't understand the following: click here to learn about variables | click here to learn about "if" statements

Variables:

set example="text"
echo %example% > file.bat
(This will output "text" to file.bat)

if we don't want it to output "text" but just plain %example% then write:

echo ^%example^% > file.bat
(This will output "%example%" to file.bat)

else statements:

else = ||
if ^%example^%=="Hello" echo True || echo False > file.bat

(This will output:
if %example%=="Hello" echo True

to output the whole line we write:

if ^%example^%=="Hello" echo True ^|^| echo False > file.bat

This will output:
if %example%=="Hello" echo True || echo False

If the variable is equal to "Hello" then it will say "True", else it will say "False"